OTC for Wilhem de Broc

Wilhem de Broc’s OTC wording is in the style of the Paston letters, 1422-1509.  http://bit.ly/rlj1HO . It was done with the permission of the royalty as  a letter written by a gentlewoman friend to his wife, Isabel Chamberlain, telling of his exploits and how the King and Queen have recognized him, and have themselves affixed their seal to the document as proof.  It was very, very long, and was presented at the Crown Tournament of King Gregor and Queen Kiena. Below is the text in period English, and beneath that is the piece in modern American English.

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To my frynde and faire jentylwoman, I recomende me unto yow, and thanke yow of your gyudenesse evermore shewed, and pray yow to contenew. I have resyvyd newes of yowr husband, Lord Wilham de Broc, a jentylman who has come to the attention of our most fierce lyon Kyng Gregor and his brave Queen Kiena.

Sondry and diverse persones have told tales of Lord Wilham and of his prowess and goodness seyn by all before hym over these many monthes, and I desire yow to hear them proclaimed.

When yew arrived from warm lands, they marvaylyd that Wilham had not borne the sword, for he comandyd it as thouh rehersyd. And saw they the sinister casueltes and consydered the sped of Wilhem and demeyd hym suche man as gode man shold be, of umble wyse, of whom dute and servyse are the most joye of erthely thynges.

He fyrst rode, as yow know, be yond to the Roses War, and ther spake a pace with men of arms. Witness seyde that he sholde take the sword up and procede to the list, and moor ovyr, that he shoulde cawse hym to take arms against brave men and knights and dukes and masters. He was entretyd to take hys myght up on thym, and many he did beste.

Thys prowess causyd hym a desyeryg place with beltless broders, and at the mudthaw he fought with them and many he did beste.

With serteynte wold he take the Pennsic field with the frendys sent hym, and broders and squires of dukes and knights and masters. For two summers he remembred hys brotheris at arms, and went to aplye the sword and hold shield against the shrewyd dragons and theyr kin.  And many he did beste.

For when hys hand hys not set to carve that wood which he lykes, and which all who see these thynges lyke, hit hath been set to sword wich hath carved with entent upon all fields, and hath troblyd soor all foe touched by his blade.

Persones seyd he shuld have his honors, and enquered after the solisitors and Kingges men, and sendeth letters and speke of his desir to serve the East, and of his long travels this wey and that wey with Pembridge kynnesmen to fight, and of his desir to master the sword and grete sword, and his corage in all dealyngs, and protection of the land from any thretis before hit, as is hys ryght as a yeoman.

And furthermore I understond that upon inquisicyon to the members of the august Order of the Tygers Combatant, it hath been agryed by Kyng Gregor and Queen Kiena that this be fynyshed hastyly for they desyred Wilhem to be named as broder to them all, and it was agreid that theye wold make a bond of hym to the Order of the Tygers Combatant upon this feast day of St. Dominator of Brescia, for Wilhem ys lyke a full trewe, harty frende to the kingdom and all gode persones, who we are wele favored with.

And so here we see this gift gret that the Kyng and Queen should geve hym, in ryght bothe in law and in concience, whereby now on feythe as moche as the maner is worth, on this day of the Crown Tournament of the East, which is the fifth day of the monthe of November, anno sociatatis XVI, in their Barony of Bergental, to induct Lord Wilhem de Broc into the Order of the Tygers Combattant, and remitt thys day to youre remembraynce.

My counseill hath told me I may sette a letter that yor may have word of this. And may oure blessed Lord ever preserve you and Wilhem, and be your governour and defender.  All this is so endorcyd by the signgatures of golden Kynge Gregor and radient Queen Kiena which bless this page, having been witnessed by the clarke and herald and all assembled in the Court this grete day.

 

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OTC for WILHEM DE BROC – in AMERICAN ENGLISH

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To my friend and fair gentlewoman, I recommend me unto you, and thank you of your guidance evermore showed, and pray you to continue. I have received news of your husband Lord Wilham de Broc, a gentleman who has come to the attention of our most fierce lyon, King Gregor and his brave Queen Kiena.

Sundry and diverse persons have told tales of Lord Wilham and of his prowess and goodness seen by all before him over these many months, and I desire you to hear them proclaimed.

When you arrived from warm lands, they marveled that Wilhem had not borne the sword for he commanded it as though rehearsed. And saw they the sinister casualties and considered the speed of Wilhelm and deemed him such man as good man should be, of humble ways, of whom duty and service are the most joy of earthly things.

He first rode, as you know, beyond to the Roses War, and there spake a pace with men of arms. Witnesses said that he should take the sword up and proceed to the list, and more over, that he should cause him to take arms against brave men and knights and dukes. He was entered to take his might upon them, and many he did best.

This prowess caused him a deserving place with beltless brothers, and at the mudthaw he fought with them, and many he did best.

With certainty would he take the Pennsic field with the friends sent him, and brothers and squires of dukes and knights and masters. For two summers he remembered his brothers at arms and went to apply the sword and hold shield against the shrewd dragons and their kin. And many did he best.

For when his hand is not set to carve that wood which he likes, and which all who see these things like, it hath been set to sword which hath carved with intent upon all fields, and hath troubled sore all foe touched by his blade.

Persons said he should have his honors, and inquired after the solicitors and king’s men, and senteth letters and spake of his desire to serve the East, and of his long travels this way and that way with Pembridge kinsmen to fight, and of his desire to master the sword and great sword, and his courage in all dealings and protection of the land from any threats before it, as is his right as a yeoman.

And furthermore, I understand that upon inquisition to the members of the august Order of the Tygers Combatant, it hath been agreed by King Gregor and Queen Kiena that this be finished hastily for they desired Wilhem to be named as brother to them all, and it was agreed that they would make a bond of him to the Order of the Tygers Combatant upon this feast day of St. Dominator of Brescia, for Wilhem is like a full, true, hearty friend to the kingdom and all good persons, who we are well favored with.

And so here we see this gift great that the King and Queen should give him, in right both in law and in conscience, whereby now on faith as much as the manner is worth, on this day of the Crown Tournament of the East, which is the fifth day of the month of November, anno sociatatis XVI, in their Barony of Bergental, to induct Lord Wilhem de Broc into the Order of the Tygers Combatant, and remit this day to your remembrance.

My counsel hath told me I may set a letter that you may have word of this. And may our blessed Lord ever preserve you and Wilhem and be your governor and defender. All this is so endorsed by the signatures of golden King Gregor and radiant Queen Kiena which bless this page, having been witnessed by the clerk and herald and all assembled in the Court this great day.

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Scroll Text for the Tir Mara Champions of Arms AS 47

FACING PAGE TRANSLATION FOR THE  HERALD
PRINCESS’ CHAMPION OF ARMS
(Words by Aneleda Falconbridge with assistance from Steffan ap Kennydd)
ex campo victoriae / from the field of victory
ense et animo / with sword and courage
et marte, et arte / both by strength and art
et vi, et virtute / both by strength and valor
ex armis exaltabit honore Thyra Principissa
Princess Thyra will exault with honor from arms
*** NAME ***
ecce propugnator Tirmarae / behold he who fights on behalf of Tir Mara

Factum per manus Eduardi nobilis et Thyrae eucharis, Principis Principissaeque Regalum Tirmarae, in Scira Silvae Ardentis, anno quadragesimo septimo [XLVII] Societatis die sexto Octobre.

Done by the hand of noble Edward and gracious Thyra, Crown Prince and Princess of Tir Mara, at the East Kingdom University in the Shire of Bois Ardent, in the 47th year of the Society, on this sixth day of October.

PRINCE’S CHAMPION OF ARMS
(Words by Aneleda Falconbridge with assistance from Steffan ap Kennydd)
ex campo victoriae  / from the field of victory
ense et animo / with sword and courage
et marte, et arte / both by strength and art
et vi, et virtute / both by strength and valor
ex armis exaltabit honore Edwardus Princeps / Prince Edward will exault with honor from arms
*** NAME ***
ecce propugnator Tirmarae / behold he who fights on behalf of Tir Mara
Factum per manus Eduardi nobilis et Thyrae eucharis, Principis Principissaeque Regalum Tirmarae, in Scira Silvae Ardentis, anno quadragesimo septimo [XLVII] Societatis die sexto Octobre.

Done by the hand of noble Edward and gracious Thyra, Crown Prince and Princess of Tir Mara, at the East Kingdom University in the Shire of Bois Ardent, in the 47th year of the Society, on this sixth day of October.

**(Scroll Assignments KA12-169 and KA12-170 – October 8, 2012 (Tir Mara Prince and Princess’ Champions of Arms Scrolls for TM EKU)**

AoA – Eoin An Doire

When shall a good man find his rest?  When boars fly over oaken tree.
When shall he work at our behest?  As long as blossoms love the bee.

In the Eastern realm there is a land where women and men are strong as tides. Among this people lives a man – as Eoin an Dore he is known.

Dependable in every way, good Eoin sets to tasks diverse. He gladly does repair the keep and build the tavern for our sport. He goes as called, on field and off, to battle mighty foes or tournament scores. He maketh cider sweet, but not so sweet as his own disposition.  Unassumingle he dons the armor bright and stands the field in tabard gold, sword in hand, to defend his king, his land, his lady.

Steadily he lands the blow, then can heal the wound. His words calm with knowledge of physic’s humors true. Tending with care to all in need, his steady hand eschews the leech, applies the salve, the poultice, the linen. These selfsame hands hold a steady bow, and strike the target right. To defend, or hunt, or sport does Eoin play, but never boasts, for he is a shining example of what a man ought be.

And so it is right and good, to bring him to the court this day at King and Queen’s Bardic Championship in Endewearde’s frozen lands, on the fifth of February, anno sociatatis XLV. By the hand of good King Gryffith most sincere, and lovely Queen Aikaterine, we welcome now Eion an Dore, and call him Lord.

 

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Now, this was not what was read at court, so I don’t know if the signet had other text, or if something was put together, but this is what I sent.  I think the scroll got tied up in storm weather, so, I’m including it here, so at least this way our newest Lord of the East will know what I thought of him, regardless of what is on the actual scroll.  ;-p

Laurel Scroll for Dutchess Aikaterine

Calligraphy by Howard Stith, Words by Monique Bouchard and illumination by Jana Brooks. Inspired by the portrait of Roger Mortimer, (d 1398), in the Robes of the Garter. 15th century document.
Laurel Scroll for Dutchess Aikaterina. Calligraphy by Howard Stith, Words by Monique Bouchard and illumination by Jana Brooks. Inspired by the portrait of Roger Mortimer, (d 1398), in the Robes of the Garter. 15th century document.

Kaffaud paub y teithi. llauen vi bri brython.
Kenhittor kirrn eluch. kathil hetuch a hinon.***

As dart verdant dragonflies
such rare grace her gifts supplies
swiftly do her fine hands sing
where threads do bloom sweet as spring

at the border, thread of gold
stitched o’re hours ‘ere untold
Fearsome tyger rampant there
golden roses twined in pair

bedeck her now greenly here
she whose talents do endear
on her brow place leaves supine –
laurels for our lady fine

laurel order stand and speak
of this gentle lady meek
Praise to Aikaterine
Saith Rex and Regina

Thus is Dutchess Aikaterine FitzWilliam brought into the Order of the Laurel at ** event/date/TBA** AS 46, by the hand of King Gregor and Queen Kiena.

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BANNER TEXT
Kaffaud paub y teithi. llauen vi bri brython.
Kenhittor kirrn eluch. kathil hetuch a hinon.

*** From the Black Book of Carmarthen, c.1250
Translation:
All Britons rejoice, sounding joyful horns.
Chanting songs of happiness and peace!
also translated as:
Everyone shall have his due, happy will be the Briton’s fame;
Horns of rejoycing will be sounded, and songs of peace and of fair weather.

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**I chose this style to reflect the location of residence for the FitzWilliam personae, on the border of Wales and England. Since Aikaterine was born in the Holy Roman Empire, so I am working on the premise that she is herself a Briton. The celebratory text of the Welsh and the Welsh verse style in English blend the two cultures.  The Cywydd deuair hyrion form I use is somewhat loose in form, my rhyming stresses are far from perfect.**

POETRY STYLE
Cywydd deuair hyrion (read CR Ward’s excellent description on it and other forms at her website…)

The most common variation is the cywydd deuair hyrion (cuh’-with day’-air her’-yon). It is made up of rhyming couplets of seven syllables each, with the accent differing on the rhyming words. This differing accentuation is called cynghanedd, which is a term for a system of alliteration and internal rhyme. There may be any number of couplets. The first line finishes with a stressed syllable and the second with an unstressed syllable. There is no set length.

x x x x x x a
x x x x x x a
x x x x x x b
x x x x x x b

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The scroll could only be so long, so I edited the original work to fit the space that was available. I sent the scribe both options.

ORIGINAL SCROLL TEXT (99 words)

As dart verdant dragonflies
such rare grace her gifts supplies
swiftly do her fine hands sing
where threads do bloom sweet as spring

linen, wool for dress and cote
heraldic charge each denote
Fearsome tyger rampant there
golden roses twined in pair

at the border thread of gold
stitched o’re hours ‘ere untold
this bouquet of skills afford
an armorial award

bedeck her now greenly here
she whose talents do endear
on her brow place leaves supine –
laurels for our lady fine

laurel order stand and speak
of this gentle lady meek
Praise to Aikaterine
Saith Rex and Regina

For Master Kraken Gnashbone, Fifteenth Tyger of the East

By Aneleda Falconbridge and Master Toki Redbeard

Trees had aged three more rings
since pass of pride gift son.
Kraken’s son we kenned Daniel
Taken from tree copse Eastern.

His father fell to the morning
Came to field, called by memory,
Joined forest of flight-swifters
to loose shafts, shoot for glory

Queen’s side-man he sought to be
He would stand, in stead of son.
Bold minded below breast fort
Forest yeoman, yew in hand.

By pyre of day in previous morn
On steed road made his journey
Hard one’s luck, who leaves his horse
Unexpected, poor his outcome.

He fell to earth fast as fletching
Bonehouse broke, on bitter landing.
Bearing new two baleful knees
Kraken walked the woods and shot.

Heavy weighed winding linen
of curved limb and curving limb
laming legs, strong man straining
Danegeld later he would pay.

Brows beams bore toward the center
With fair wings wing-branch went
As the peregrine to its pine tree.
To ring-goddess great his tribute.

His orbs shone on elm of rose
At queens foot stand forester bowed
draped across shoulder branches
Flood-flame roses framed her champion.

Shapers of war wove his song
told to poet with proud awe
Son of Uller stood this ground
Heard you now hawk sharp saga.

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This poem came as a request from two Kings I served, Lucan and Gregor, as a request that I honor Master Kraken on the day he became Queen’s Champion of Archery in AS46. It was to be given to Kraken, with whom I spent gleeful time during my year standing behind the throne, and who always made me feel light at heart.

The tale was told to Master Toki at Pennsic 40, where we began this poem, with him teaching me the basics of alliterative Norse verse as I explained my visions, and Toki made them into verse. I took it home and worked on the remainder of it on my own, adding many verses, changing some of that great Master’s lines even, to be more of my intent, and then returned it to Toki at the War of the Roses AS47. He took my fledgling efforts and gave them wing as we worked on correcting the alliteration (which I *nearly* get but which still is unthinkably difficult to me!) while working to keep my words, tone, style and story intact as we brainstormed ways to correct this or that, or make this line or that one better. There are some places which break and bend rules, with the understanding that this piece is really one for voice and not as much for page.

This is the result of his skillful filing of the rough work.

It was my great joy to have been able to present this to Master Kraken at the Great Northeastern War, AS47, as he was made the Fifteenth Tyger of the East by King Kenric. He is a legend of the East, and I am proud to have been able to tell one of his tales.