River-bone Warrior – a Song for Talen

 

Odin grant me one more battle

that I may die on warriors ground

Guide my soul to meet the Æsir,

You whom sacrifice has bound.

 

The Idis gave me fearful fortune –

raise battle-light and turn to stone.

Yet I shall cast into the striving

though norns have named me river-bone

 

My life is yet an uncut thread!

deaf to Mimir’s warning be –

With shield-gnawers I will run

Bed-shame never shall I see!

Hear the black song of this reaver –

The straw-death shall not have me!

Hear above the cold tree breaker

calling down the valkyrie.

 

I will don my burnished war net

and go to where the blood-swan sings

to meet the day of flame-farewell,

hear battle song in raven’s wings.

 

bonehouse will not bear my war-gear

so I hear upon the wind,

I raise my glass and join my hallsmen

then raise blood-ember to discind

 

My life is yet an uncut thread!

deaf to Mimir’s warning be –

With shield-gnawers I will run

Bed-shame never shall I see!

Hear the black song of this reaver –

The straw-death shall not have me!

Hear above the cold tree breaker

calling down the valkyrie.

 

Hanging god give me no pity

my battle-sweat runs hot within

It need not be a field of honor;

I shall not die as cattle-kin!

 

Odin grant me one more battle

that I may die on warriors ground

Guide my soul to meet the Æsir,

You whom sacrifice has bound.

 

My life is yet an uncut thread!

deaf to Mimir’s warning be –

With shield-gnawers I will run

Bed-shame never shall I see!

Hear the black song of this reaver –

The straw-death shall not have me!

Hear above the cold tree breaker

calling down the valkyrie.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________

 

This is a song for a warrior who has been told by the norns that if he lifts a sword again, he will turn to stone. They have already named him river-bone (stone.) He knows his body will break if he puts on his armor. But he will not, as any good Norse warrior would not, lay in his bed and wait, but chooses to join his brothers at war anyway, calling on the valkyries to come as he asks Odin for one final battle before the norns sever the threads of  his life if he battles. We don’t know what happens, only what his will is.

I may make this into a story at some point too.

This poem/song is inspired by Talen Wristbiter, whose warrior-spirit raised my muse today – her spear held to my back until I finished it – by writing about how he has been told that  he must stop fighting (and working) for his health, but how he refuses to stop fighting and working because those things give him purpose and meaning, without which life cannot be truly lived. That fierceness of spirit felt brave, and foolish, and admirable, and I was (and remain) in awe of it.

Thank you my war-brother. May your days on the field be many. -aneleda

Tourney Pilgrims

Written for the aspirants in the Armored Combat League trying for a spot in the Battle of the Nations Team USA.

The Pilgrim to the Tourney

The faithful pilgrim packs his pack
And starts upon the road,
Begins the journey with light step,
Though his arms bear a weighty load

Before him lay the journey long
Though legs may tire, his back is strong.
With others he marches in throng
His worth to prove to all.

The pilgrims take it foot by foot
Along the way they work and play.
Behind them are so many paths
Yet from here not a one will stray.

The way is often fierce and hard
They have been beaten, have been scarred
Yet unbruised honor well they guard
Their worth to prove to all.

Your eyes rest on the lofty goal
The keep is close, within your reach
With dented armor, polished arms
The close’d door each man must breach.

Brother now with brother pray
The pilgrim’s cloak now put away
With brutal chivalry display
Your worth to prove to all.

For all the brutal pilgrims taking this road today, I offer this (somewhat hastily composted) encouragement as you journey to the list. Stay safe, ferocious pilgrims. – aneleda

þis feste is ine myn stomak – part the first

A story about how everyone just wants to go to the party.

Ian: "I doubt you could find the appropriate documentation for this song. And though the lyrics are simple and alliterative, I do not believe this could pass as a 14th Century Chanson." Monique: "Is that a....challenge?" Ian: "If you could translate this into middle English and put it to period music..."  Monique: "Accepted."
Ian: “I doubt you could find the appropriate documentation for this song. And though the lyrics are simple and alliterative, I do not believe this could pass as a 14th Century Chanson.”
Monique: “Is that a….challenge?”
Ian: “If you could translate this into middle English and put it to period music…”
Monique: “Accepted.”


________________________________________

Al hayl myn frende. Dinen gan.

What now, alle. Dinen gan

Whi nat ete?

Heren Osbert, whi nat ete?

Mmm!

I eate, y fayth!

Gode, gode!

I eate, y fayth!

Gode, gode!

 

Henne! What how!

In myn stomak!

Feste, feste. O! in myn stomak.

 

Chese! What how!

In myne stomak!

Feste, feste. O! in myn stomak.

 

Jus! What how!

In myn stomak!

What how!

 

þis feste is ine myne stomak.

So gode, so gode.

Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

Al hayl! þis feste is ine myne stomak.

So gode, so gode.

Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

 

Good, good.

Welylawey!

Cryestow?

We wod mak feste in thyn stomak,

thilke feste in thyn stomak

Mores wolde festen in myn stomak?

Yis!

O! Grene benes wolde festen in myn stomak?

Yis!

 

A ye! Wenden doun!

Mores! Al hayl!

In myn stomak!

Feste, feste.

O! Ine myn stomak.

Grene benes! Al hayl!

Ine myn stomak!

Feste, feste.

O! Ine myn stomak.

 

þis feste is ine myn stomak.

So gode, so gode.

Now, þis feste is ine myn stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

 

Now, þis feste is ine myn stomak.

So gode, so gode.

So, þis feste is ine myn stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

 

Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

 

I love þis feste is ine myn stomak!

 

_________________________________________

So of course, this is a challenge to make the Yo Gabba Gabba “Party in my stomach” song into Middle English. (You may all thank Master Angus Pembridge for the throw-down.)

HOWEVER as with many things, it has proved (and is proving) a delightful challenge. A somewhat informed translation of this relatively simple piece has been hilarious. Many of these words don’t exist in Middle English so getting the idea of them without losing the humor has been a great challenge. It’s also, naturally, been a better teacher for me about Middle English than many projects have been, because I had to consider “I” and “my” and “your” and what carrots would have been called. It took me far past “forsoothly” and into the realm of Chaucer’s works, dictionaries, and a paper on exclamations in Chaucer’s writings.  I have deep respect for translators.

I’ll probably learn more about this, and I’m sure there are corrections, but it’s a solid work in progress I think.

Next I have to set it to appropriate period music. Middle English Chanson is the challenge. It will not resemble this in structure I think, but it will in spirit.

The process is below, with some links to some of the more helpful sources I used.

Hello, friends.It’s lunchtime.Hey, everyone.It’s lunchtime.Time to eat!Here you go, Brobee.

Time to eat!

Mmm!

All hail my friends.Go dine!What now all.Go dine.Why not eat?Here you go Osbert.

Why not eat?

Mmm!

Al hayl myn frenden.Dinen  gan. What now alle.Dinen  gan.Whi nat ete?Heren Osbert.

Whi nat ete?

Mmm!

I’m gonna eat, yeah.Yummy, yummy.Gonna eat, yeah!Yummy, yummy. I eat, by faith!Good, good!I eat, ey!Good, good. I eate, y fayth!Gode, gode!I eate, ey!Gode, gode!
Chicken! (Yeah!)  In my tummy.Party, party.(Yeah!) In my tummy.Cheese! (Yeah!)  In my tummy.Party, party.(Yeah!)  In my tummy Hen! What how! In my stomach!Feast, feast!Oh! In my stomach.Cheese! What how! In my stomach.Feast, feast.Oh! In my stomach Henne! What how! In myn  stomak!Feste, feste.O! in myn stomak.Chese! What how! In myne  stomak!Feste, feste.O! in myn stomak.
Juice! (Yeah!)In my tummy.Yeah! Broth! What how!In my stomach.Oh. Jus! What how!In myn stomakO
There’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy.)Now, there’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy, yummy.)Hey, there’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy.)Now, there’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy, yummy.)Yummy, yummy! This feast is in my stomach.So good, so goodNow there is a feast in my stomach.So good, so good, good.All hail! There is a feast in my stomach.So good, so good.Now there is a feast in my stomach.So good, so good, good.Good, good. þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode.Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode, gode.Al hayl! þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so godeNow, þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode, gode.Good, good.
(CRYING)Why are you sad?(We want to go to the party, the party in your tummy.)Carrots want to go to the party in my tummy?(Yeah!)Oh! Well, do green beans want to go to the party in my tummy?(Yeah!)Well, okay! Let’s go! (Exclamation, sad.)Why do you cry?We would make feast in your stomach, the feast in your stomach.Carrots want to feast in my stomach?Yes!Oh! Green beans would feast in my stomach?Yes!A ye! Let’s go down! Welylawey!Cryestow?We wod mak feste in thyn stomak, thilke feste in thyn stomakMores wolde festen in myn stomak?Yis!O! Grene benes wolde festen in myn stomak?Yis!A ye! Wenden dounn
Carrots! (Yeah!)In my tummy.Party, party.(Yeah!)In my tummy.Green beans! (Yeah!)In my tummy.Party, party. (Yeah!)In my tummy. Carrots! All hail!In my stomach.Feast, feast!Oh! In my stomach.Green beans! All hail! In my stomach.Feast, feast. Oh!In my stomach Mores! Al hayl!In myn  stomak!Feste, feste.O! in myn stomak.Grene benes! Al hayl!In myn  stomak!Feste, feste.O! in myn stomak.
There’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy.)Now, there’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy, yummy.)Now, there’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy.)So, there’s a party in my tummy.(So yummy. So yummy, yummy.)Now, there’s a party in my tummy.

(So yummy. So yummy.)

Now, there’s a party in my tummy.

(So yummy. So yummy, yummy.)

Yummy, yummy!

I love the party in my tummy!

 

This feast is in my stomach.So good, so good.Now there is a feast in my stomach.So good, so good, good.All hail! There is a feast in my stomach.So good, so good.So there is a feast in my stomach.So good, so good, good.Now, this feast is in my stomach.So good, so good

Now there is a feast in my stomach.

So good, so good, good

Good, good!

I love this feast in my stomac

 

þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode.Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode, gode.Now, þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode.So, þis feste is ine myne stomak.So gode, so gode, gode.Now, þis feste is ine myn stomakSo gode, so gode.

Now, þis feste is ine myn stomak.

So gode, so gode, gode.

Gode, gode!

I love þis feste is ine myne stomak!

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Middle_English_parts_of_speech

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/tmsmenu.htm#w

http://www.nativlang.com/middle-english/middle-english-grammar.php

http://www.frathwiki.com/Middle_English

http://archive.org/stream/middleenglishdic00stra/middleenglishdic00stra_djvu.txt

http://www.lexilogos.com/english/english_middle.htm

I Fight for You

The Queen’s Meadhall in Carolingia was where this song was first publicly performed. It was written after a conversation with Aneleda’s noble cousin and friend Gryffyn Dunham, who was on the unbelted team at the time, about what inspires us do do what we do on the field (and elsewhere.) Since I had no song that really fit that theme, I wrote this one.

This song is featured on the CD “I Am of the North” available for purchase online at:  http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/aneledafalconbridge/

I Fight for You 

I fight for you,
my one, my love, my own
You who give more strength to me
than I would know alone.
While my arms are bound in linen
and my legs are wrapped in steel
nothing brings me to my knees
as the way you make me feel.
I fight for you.

Many are the days and nights
when I have left you behind;
deep within a warrior’s trance
seemed to push you from my mind.
But know that you are all to me
no matter what I show
for I don the armor to protect
what I hold safely below.

I fight for you...etc.

The miles, they leave me lonesome
for the warrior’s road is long.
I miss your laughter ‘round the fire
And your voice raised soft in song.
As I look up to the star’s light
that I know above you shine,
I pray that my thoughts carry
to the love I know is mine.

I fight for you...etc.

Each buckle and each lacing
Marks the rituals of war,
Knowing solidly and firmly
that for you I would do more.
With my life I will protect you
and would keep you from all harm,
each time I step upon the field
I wear that knowledge as a charm.

I fight for you...etc.

When I have the time I watch you
‘neath the shadow of my helm.
But I do not do it often
lest my feelings overwhelm.
With all the honor in my being
I take every day for you
I swear that your belief in me
I shall never make you rue.

I fight for you...etc.

SCAvenger Hunt for Younglings

Visitors and SCAdians at Fort Knox in Maine. Photo by Ed Dumont.
Visitors and SCAdians at Fort Knox in Maine. Photo by Ed Dumont.

We have a big demo annually at a beautiful granite fort which is a state park. It brings between 1000-1700 members of the general public on a single Saturday in September who see a day of SCA activities, staged somewhat like a theatre show or a circus – there is a large green where the “performances” happen and the “audience” is around them.

We have a parade, fencing, music, dancing, and a pas d’armes – the set takes about 2.5 hours and there is a fashion show in the middle before the second set begins. We also have A&S displays and martial displays happening around the fort. All four of the SCA groups in Maine attend and assist at this demo and sometimes folks will come from even farther to play!

Singers perform near one of the gun bays. Photo by Ed Dumont.
Singers perform near one of the gun bays. Photo by Ed Dumont.

Because it can be overwhelming, one year I made a SCAvenger Hunt to help littler ones have a good experience. It worked really well! The next year we got neighboring Malagentia’s Mistress Carolyne de laPointe, to make a little scroll for us to give as a certificate. We photocopy them on cool paper and sign their name in calligraphy. We change some things every year and even adults get into the spirit of the thing!

  • it gives a goal and some focus
  • it ensures that visitors have an idea of all we do
  • people get a checklist of things to try
  • it is rewarding on its own; more with a token upon completion
  • it can be done on any timeframe (minutes or hours!)
  • it is easily adaptable
  • it is very inexpensive
  • it encourages people to interact with our SCA members and ask questions about the Society

Here is what we use – make some for your demo or event. We print them on half-pages of regular sized paper.

Or maybe give younglings a token when they complete the hunt!

This is our certificate:

Youth-Scroll-NO YEAR

SCAventer Hunt for 2011

There is a lot going on today! Do the things listed, and
get an SCA member initials beside what you’ve tried.
When you’re finished, come to the Info Point inside the
Fort for a special certificate!

Learn and say a medieval name.
Listen to a piece of music.
Touch something handmade.
Hold a piece of chain maile.
Touch a ballista.
Hold a sword.
Talk to someone in armor.
Count the feathers on an arrow.
Try on a helmet.
Find someone wearing a kirtle.

(These we print and cut to quarter-page.)

SCAvenger11