Lijsbet von Catwick – Silver Brooch

Artificael geesten, die na conste haect,
Niet en is gemaect dan uut rechter trouwen sterck;
Neemt hieraan gemere, opdat gjij die gunste smaect.*

Artistic tempers, with art on your minds
Nothing here but what in good faith was done.
Now knowing this, relish its affection even more.

We, Brion Rex and Anna Regina bid all Eastern subjects to note the deeds of art wrought by their loyal subject Lijsbet von Catwick. A woman of great artistic curiosity, she cheerfully explores with great abandon and success. Helpful herbs, crafted clothing, fine foods, shaped sugar, little lamps, hardscrabble houpalands — little escapes her interest.

As is fitting for one with a love of arts diverse and sundry, We hereby induct Lijsbet to the Order of the Silver Brooch and award her Arms for her to bear Per chevron inverted urdy purpure and argent semy of escallops purpure, in chief a sea-dragon naiant Or, making her this day a Lady of the Court.

Done by Our hand at the Crown Tournament in the Province of Malagentia on the fifth day of November, A.S. LI.

Brion Rex and Anna Regina


Calligraphy by The Honorable Lord Gwillim Kynith, Illumination by Mistress Agatha Wanderer, Words by Mistress Aneleda Falconbridge and **Anna Bijns (1493-1575) Middle High Dutch poem, translated by Kristaan Aercke. From “Women’s Writing from the Low Countries 1200-1875: A Bilingual Anthology” edited by Lia van Gemert.

November 5, 2016


What’s Worn Beneath The Kilt: The Scotsman Updated

The first time I heard “The Scotsman Song” written in 1979 by Mike Cross, I found it funny. I was young and the idea was kind of hilarious, a turnabout that was unexpected  and silly. I mean, who on earth would do that, right?

However, I’ve gotten older and I’ve gotten to know many men who wear kilts and who have had many questions about how they’re attired, at best, and have been groped for that discovery, at worst. Add to that that the gent in question is drunk and thereby nonconsensual…well, this song has become Very Problematic for me and I can’t stomach the original because it feels so inappropriate that I can’t find it funny any more.

Because it’s still a staple in the Ren Faire world and often performed in the SCA, I decided to write my OWN version, update to embrace the behavior I expect from others.

Please, feel free to adopt it into your own songbooks.

Download a binder-ready pdf version right here:  What’s Worn Beneath The Kilt_ The Scotsman Updated


“What’s Worn Beneath The Kilt: The Scotsman Updated”
– by Aneleda Falconbridge (mka Monique Bouchard) based on “The Scotsman Song” by Mike Cross, 1979

A Scotsman clad in kilt left the bar one evening fair
And one could tell by how he walked he’d drunk more than his share
He stumbled on until he could no longer keep his feet
Then staggered off into the grass to sleep beside the street.

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle i o deet
He staggered off into the grass to sleep beside the street.

Later on two young and lovely girls just happened by,
And one says to the other with a twinkle in her eye
You see yon sleeping Scotsman so strong and handsome built
I wonder if it’s true what they don’t wear beneath their kilt.

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o  Ring di diddle i o dilt
I wonder if it’s true what they don’t wear beneath their kilt.

They crept up to the sleeping Scot as quiet as could be
And at a decent distance they waited patiently
That they might discover if  beneath that Scottish skirt
Were boxers, stretchy Y fronts, or the clothes he’d worn at birth

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle i o dirth
Were boxers, stretchy Y fronts, or the clothes he’d worn at birth

They waited for a hour then one said we’d best be gone
The other wanted answers but they’d both begun to yawn
They took out blue silk ribbon, tied their hair up in a bow
So it wouldn’t be too tangled as they they slept in the meadow.

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle i o doh
So it wouldn’t be too tangled as they they slept in the meadow.

The Scotsman woke to nature’s call and stumbled toward the trees
Behind a bush he spied them, just waking in dawn’s breeze
With a cheery greeting the ladies caught his eyes
“Beg pardon, would you tell us of this garment o’er your thighs?”

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle io die
“Beg pardon, would you tell us of this garment o’er your thighs?”

“We’ve heard many a rumor ‘bout what’s worn beneath the plaid,
Would you please enlighten as how you might be clad?”
We’ve waited through the evening to ask you with respect
Which of the many rumors is the one that is correct.

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle i o dekt
Which of the many rumors is the one that is correct.

Thank you so for asking, the bonnie lad did say,
Rather than assuming things about my modesty
Surely I will tell you since you’ve waited since last night….

(spoken) AHEM. Well, there’s no Scottish Highlander’s Rulebook or anything and this subject is divided even among the most cultured Scots. As a matter of fact, according to a survey* of kilt wearing Scots, a full 55% wear shorts or briefs beneath their kilts. The rest do not. However, it’s worth noting that The Scottish Tartans Authority has decreed that refusing to wear underwear beneath the country’s national dress is “childish and unhygienic” but….

Depending on the kilt wearer, both answers may be right!

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle i o dite
But depending on the kilt wearer, both answers may be right!

The ladies rose and thanked him for the sharing of these facts
In turn he also thanked them for polite and civil acts

Please accept our ribbons for our views have been revised,

And we know more than we did before– knowledge ought be prized!

Ring ding diddle diddle i de o Ring di diddle i o diez
O we know more than we did before– knowledge ought be prized!

 

* https://yougov.co.uk/news/2016/10/09/what-does-scotsman-wear-under-his-kilt/

 

 

Sir Cedric of Thanet – Order of the Silver Mantle

quocunque jeceris stabit*

We offreth with gret reverence,
And aske in open audience
To Thanet set your eyes o friend,
That you sall see what alle we sende
Syr Cedric, who on knee doth grette,
A knight, both comly and sae sweete.
He picked an axe and lette it fly
To see where it lande from the sky,
It does not strike the goal by chaunce
But strength and minde in keene balance.
At every chance he did rehearse
Thrown items of nature diverse.
His skill brought many for to seche
He undertook them alle to teache.
With tone so calm and speache so blythe
He showed the way to throw als swithe.
Unto the ladies hihe and loude;
to  knyhtes that ben yonge and proude,
To little childe and mighty lord,
And all who came of good accord.
A maister of the sharpened blade
So many strikes Syr Cedric made.
And building boards and making things
And teaching folk and serving Kinges,
The skill in each he seemed to finde
With gentyl manner ever kinde.
He who most worthi was of dede
Receive he scholde a certein mede
A Silver Mantle we now give
That he may bear long as he live.

This is done by the hand of Basilissa Caoilfhionn & Basileus Brennan at their Court in the Province of Malagentia at the Great Northeastern War on July 14, anno sociatis fifty-three.

illuminated manuscript with the poem in this page


Syr Cedric is a part of my house, Thanet, and a kind friend and mentor for many years. I was thrilled to be asked to create words for his inclusion in the Order of the Silver Mantle for his prowess and teaching of thrown weapons.

It’s been a while since I have fully created a new work rather than adapting an existing one to some degree or other. For this piece I chose Middle English and the style is that of the octosyllabic English couplet which was favored by John Gower (1330 – 1408) who wrote during the time that Syr Cedric would have lived. To learn more, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gower

I made a strong effort to use only end-rhymes that would have appeared in Gower’s time period.

The motto at the top “quocunque jeceris stabit” is “whithersoever you throw it, it will stand” — the motto of the Isle of Man which is at least in Britannia. I thought that it worked really well as a motto for this piece too, since it’s been very much Cedric’s ability! 

Lady Keziah and I had a brief turnaround time for this piece, so it’s 231 words.

Audrye Benyet – Silver Crescent

To all noble kin we now present,
That all consider graciously
The thought, the mind, and the intent
Who loves the East most faithfully.

Her heart of service to you proffer’d
With right good will full honestly,
Refuse it not, since it is offer’d,
But take it to you gentlely.

Far to travel, to run, to ride,
She undertakes it pleasantly;
Bid her to go, straight she doth glide
At your commandement humbly.

Audrye Benyet now we doth entreat
Companion be, not secretly
Silver Crescent Order comes to greet
She who has served all steadfastly.

Amid this Great Northeastern War
The passing year marked fifty-three
Our Grant this day shall be abject:
Therefore accept it lovingly.

On June’s fourteenth day assuredly,
Since this so much we do desire,
Reward Our servant liberally.
For all her service and her hire.

Assigned by Eastern Royalty
Emperor Brennan Empress Caoilfhionn

An image of a recreated medieval style illuminated page, with the text of this article
Illumination by Mistress Agatha Wanderer, Calligraphy by Duchess Thyra Eriksdottir, words by Mistress Aneleda Falconbridge


Calligraphy by Thyra Eiriksdottir. Illumination by Agatha Wanderer. Words from Sir Thomas Wyatt’s “The Heart and Service” adapted by Aneleda Falconbridge.

BASE SELECTION “The Heart and Service” Sir Thomas Wyatt – 1503-1542

This work seemed perfect as a starting point, as even its title provides appropriate context for Audrye’s work! I wanted to stay true to the feel and form, and as the piece was requested to be relatively short, it was a good poetic style to use to accommodate that request. It is 147 words, including the signature line.

The original is here: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45577/the-heart-and-service

The typical form for this piece seems to be loosely based on rhyme royal with lines of varying syllables and matched rhymes.
A (9 syl)
B (8 syl)
A (9 syl)
B (8 syl)

Sir Thomas Wyatt –1503–1542

“Born in Kent, England, Sir Thomas Wyatt was an ambassador to France and Italy for King Henry VIII. Wyatt’s travels abroad exposed him to different forms of poetry, which he adapted for the English language — most notably, the sonnet. Rumored to be Anne Boleyn’s lover, he spent a month in the Tower of London until Boleyn’s execution for adultery. Many consider his poem “Whoso List to Hunt” to be about Boleyn.”

https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/hunting-for-thomas-wyatt/

 

Estgar Hrothcaster – Pelicanus Est

LIII AS VII Apr
DNSILLUMINATIOMEA*

  1. Omnibus paribus nobilibus et gentilibus
  2. Vocem populi audimus. Vobis damus
  3. secundum postulationem Ordinis Pelicani
  4. nostrum fidelissimum Estgar de Hroficester.
  5. Rectus et fortis est et propensus omnes
  6. juvare. Construxit multas vias, conservit
  7. pacem, servavit populum. Intellegunt opera
  8. Estgari et opera manuum. Hic vir bonus est.
  9. Desiderabilia super aurum et lapidem
  10. pretiosum multum et dulciora
  11. super mel et favum redundantem. **
  12. Damus secundum sua opera.
  13. Reddimus ad Estgarum commodum justum.
  14. Dignitatem agnoscimus nostri Estgari
  15. apud aulam nostram in Scira Quintaviae.
  16. Bagnum est nomen in multis terris.
  17. Pelicanus est.
  18. + Ego Ivanus rex Orientis consensi et subscripsi
  19. + Ego  Matilda regina Orientis consensi et subscripsi

*The Lord is my Light, with “Dominus” abbreviated. (Dreda)
** Psalm 18:11 http://vulgate.org/ot/psalms_18.htm


Isabel Chamberlain’s Completed Scroll, with words by Aneleda Falconbridge and interlinear text by Alidreda de Tamwurthe.

Main sources:

Artistic inspiration is Vespasian Psalter, believed to be the first Latin-to-English translation of the Psalms (into Anglo-Saxon) written, it is thought, in the second quarter of the eighth century. The document features an abbreviated version of Psalm 26 (27).

Original document: https://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/TourPopupMax.asp?TourID=3

My goals were to have the document look like the original as much as possible.

The text has nearly the same number of lines and nearly the same number of capital letters as the original.

The top image can remain exactly as on the extant. The small letters above will turn into the date of the award.

ABOVE the Latin, as with the extant document, is the text translated to early English/Anglo-Saxon by Mistress Aildreda de Tamwurthe, who is amazing. Then Mistress Isabel Chamberlain put the whole thing together. It was a labor of love.

Dreda’s interlinear text in Anglo-Saxon, as sent to Isabel.


Resources:

Latin-English Study Bible: Vulgatæ Editionis

Latin Vulgate text, English translation (CPDV), and translation commentary. Ronald L. Conte Jr., translator and editor

http://www.sacredbible.org/studybible/OT-21_Psalms.htm#top

British Academy Anglo Saxon Charter website

http://aschart.kcl.ac.uk/charters/s0034.html

Medieval psalter language of the psalm on the original document

http://www.medievalist.net/psalmstxt/ps27.htm

Edits to the Latin by Master Steffan ap Kennydd (while in lines at Disney World, on vacation, may his name be blessed forever)

Anglo Saxon by Mistress Aildreda de Tamwurthe

Sausage Making Process and Research Documents here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/13WdiVeVipYTP3K9LqtE_oDo–repNZg7ZQE3G2KpuJI/edit

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_o-aYBVsVbrBTTwfFpdSiObMdZLDb-f6fdvB2ZCSTYs/edit


Aneleda’s English Text:


In the year of the Society 53, April 7
DNSILLUMINATIOMEA

All Peers, Nobles, and Gentles
We hear the voice of the people.
I give you at the request of the Order of the Pelican my loyal Estgar aet Hrofiscester.
Straight and strong and willing to help everyone.
He built roads, many, keeps the peace, serves the people.
They understand the works of Estgar and the work of his hands.
The man is good.
More precious than gold and precious stones: and sweeter than honey and the honeycomb.
Give him according to his works.
Render to Estgar his reward.
We acknowledge the dignity of our Estagr at our court in the Shire of Quintavia.
Great is his name in many lands.
He is a Pelican.
+ I Ivan King of the East agree and subscribe
+ I Matilde Queen of the East agree and subscribe

Aneleda’s Latin Text:

LIII anno societatis VII Aprilis
DNSILLUMINATIOMEA

Omnibus paribus nobilibus gentilibus
A voce et a populus audi nos.
Do tibi tuæque ad pelecānōrummeo fidelissimo Estgarus Hrofiscestri.
Rect et fortis et patiens Adiutor omnis.
Construxit itineribus multis, custodit pacem, serves populus.
Quoniam intellegunt opera Estgarum et opus manuum.
Ipse vir bonum.
Desiderabilia super aurum et lapidem pretiosum multum et dulciora super mel et favum redundantem.
Redde ipsis retributionem.
Da Estgarus secundum ipsis opera.
Dignitatemque agnoscimus nostrorum Estagrum apud aulam nostram in villa Quintavia. admirábile est nomen eius in multis eius terras
Ipse vir pelecānum est.
+ Ego Ivanus rex Oreintalum consensi et subscripsi
+ Ego Matilde regina Oreintalum consensi et subscripsi

Steffan’s Edits to the Latin Text:

LIII AS VII Apr
DNSILLUMINATIOMEA

Omnibus paribus nobilibus et gentilibus
Vocem populi audimus
Vobis damus secundum postulationem Ordinis Pelicani nostrum fidelissimum Estgar de Hroficester.
Rectus et fortis est et propensus omnes juvare.
Construxit multas vias, conservit pacem, servavit populum.
Intellegunt opera Estgari et opera manuum.
Hic vir bonus est.
Desiderabilia super aurum et lapidem pretiosum multum et dulciora super mel et favum redundantem.*
Damus secundum sua opera.
Reddimus ad Estgarum commodum justum.
Dignitatem agnoscimus nostri Estgari apud aulam nostram in Scira Quintaviae.
Magnum est nomen in multis terris.
Pelicanus est.
+ Ego Ivanus rex Orientis consensi et subscripsi
+ Ego  Matilda regina Orientis consensi et subscripsi

** this was taken directly from the Vulgate. Psalm 18:11 http://vulgate.org/ot/psalms_18.htm

English Translation of the Final Latin

LIII AS VII Apr
DNSILLUMINATIOMEA

TO all peers, nobles and gentles
We hear the voice of the people
We give to you, according to the petition of the Order of the Pelican Our most faithful Estgar of Hroficester
Straight and strong he is and willing to help all.
He has built many roads, conserved the peace, served and protected the people.
They recognize Estgar’s works and the works of his hands.
This one is a good man.
More precious than gold and precious stones
And sweeter than honey and the honeycomb.
We give according to his works.
We render to Estgar his proper reward.
We acknowledge the dignity of our Estgar among our shire of Quintavia.
Great is his name in many lands
He is a Pelican.
+ I Ivan King of the East agree and subscribe
+ I Matilde Queen of the East agree and subscribe