Wilhem de Broc, OTC

Wilhem de Broc and Isabel Chamberlain, photo by Cateline la Broderesse
Wilhem de Broc and Isabel Chamberlain, photo by Cateline la Broderesse. As you can see, Lady Isabel knows something that Lord Wilhem doesn't yet.

To my frynde and faire jentylwoman, I recomende me unto yow, and thanke yow of your gyudenesse evermore shewed, and pray yow to contenew. I have resyvyd newes of yowr husband, Lord Wilham de Broc, a jentylman who has come to the attention of our most fierce lyon Kyng Gregor and his brave Queen Kiena.

Sondry and diverse persones have told tales of Lord Wilham and of his prowess and goodness seyn by all before hym over these many monthes, and I desire yow to hear them proclaimed.

When yew arrived from warm lands, they marvaylyd that Wilham had not borne the sword, for he comandyd it as thouh rehersyd. And saw they the sinister casueltes and consydered the sped of Wilhem and demeyd hym suche man as gode man shold be, of umble wyse, of whom dute and servyse are the most joye of erthely thynges.

He fyrst rode, as yow know, be yond to the Roses War, and ther spake a pace with men of arms. Witness seyde that he sholde take the sword up and procede to the list, and moor ovyr, that he shoulde cawse hym to take arms against brave men and knights and dukes and masters. He was entretyd to take hys myght up on thym, and many he did beste.

Thys prowess causyd hym a desyeryg place with beltless broders, and at the mudthaw he fought with them and many he did beste.

With serteynte wold he take the Pennsic field with the frendys sent hym, and broders and squires of dukes and knights and masters. For two summers he remembred hys brotheris at arms, and went to aplye the sword and hold shield against the shrewyd dragons and theyr kin.  And many he did beste.

For when hys hand hys not set to carve that wood which he lykes, and which all who see these thynges lyke, hit hath been set to sword wich hath carved with entent upon all fields, and hath troblyd soor all foe touched by his blade.

Persones seyd he shuld have his honors, and enquered after the solisitors and Kingges men, and sendeth letters and speke of his desir to serve the East, and of his long travels this wey and that wey with Pembridge kynnesmen to fight, and of his desir to master the sword and grete sword, and his corage in all dealyngs, and protection of the land from any thretis before hit, as is hys ryght as a yeoman.

And furthermore I understond that upon inquisicyon to the members of the august Order of the Tygers Combatant, it hath been agryed by Kyng Gregor and Queen Kiena that this be fynyshed hastyly for they desyred Wilhem to be named as broder to them all, and it was agreid that theye wold make a bond of hym to the Order of the Tygers Combatant upon this feast day of St. Dominator of Brescia, for Wilhem ys lyke a full trewe, harty frende to the kingdom and all gode persones, who we are wele favored with.

And so here we see this gift gret that the Kyng and Queen should geve hym, in ryght bothe in law and in concience, whereby now on feythe as moche as the maner is worth, on this day of the Crown Tournament of the East, which is the fifth day of the monthe of November, anno sociatatis XVI, in their Barony of Bergental, to induct Lord Wilhem de Broc into the Order of the Tygers Combattant, and remitt thys day to youre remembraynce.

My counseill hath told me I may sette a letter that yor may have word of this. And may oure blessed Lord ever preserve you and Wilhem, and be your governour and defender.  All this is so endorcyd by the signgatures of golden Kynge Gregor and radient Queen Kiena which bless this page, having been witnessed by the clarke and herald and all assembled in the Court this grete day.

Written in the style of the Paston letters, which are those from a family collected between 1422 and 1509, with Wilhem’s lady, Isabel as the person to whom the letter is addressed, with him as the subject. You can also read many of the original letters which are online. You may read them here. The modern English “translation” is below.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

To my friend and fair gentlewoman, I recommend me unto you, and thank you of your guidance evermore showed, and pray you to continue. I have received news of your husband Lord Wilham de Broc, a gentleman who has come to the attention of our most fierce lyon, King Gregor and his brave Queen Kiena.

Sundry and diverse persons have told tales of Lord Wilham and of his prowess and goodness seen by all before him over these many months, and I desire you to hear them proclaimed.

When you arrived from warm lands, they marveled that Wilhem had not borne the sword for he commanded it as though rehearsed. And saw they the sinister casualties and considered the speed of Wilhelm and deemed him such man as good man should be, of humble ways, of whom duty and service are the most joy of earthly things.

He first rode, as you know, beyond to the Roses War, and there spake a pace with men of arms. Witnesses said that he should take the sword up and proceed to the list, and more over, that he should cause him to take arms against brave men and knights and dukes. He was entered to take his might upon them, and many he did best.

This prowess caused him a deserving place with beltless brothers, and at the mudthaw he fought with them, and many he did best.

With certainty would he take the Pennsic field with the friends sent him, and brothers and squires of dukes and knights and masters. For two summers he remembered his brothers at arms and went to apply the sword and hold shield against the shrewd dragons and their kin. And many did he best.

For when his hand is not set to carve that wood which he likes, and which all who see these things like, it hath been set to sword which hath carved with intent upon all fields, and hath troubled sore all foe touched by his blade.

Persons said he should have his honors, and inquired after the solicitors and king’s men, and senteth letters and spake of his desire to serve the East, and of his long travels this way and that way with Pembridge kinsmen to fight, and of his desire to master the sword and great sword, and his courage in all dealings and protection of the land from any threats before it, as is his right as a yeoman.

And furthermore, I understand that upon inquisition to the members of the august Order of the Tygers Combatant, it hath been agreed by King Gregor and Queen Kiena that this be finished hastily for they desired Wilhem to be named as brother to them all, and it was agreed that they would make a bond of him to the Order of the Tygers Combatant upon this feast day of St. Dominator of Brescia, for Wilhem is like a full, true, hearty friend to the kingdom and all good persons, who we are well favored with.

And so here we see this gift great that the King and Queen should give him, in right both in law and in conscience, whereby now on faith as much as the manner is worth, on this day of the Crown Tournament of the East, which is the fifth day of the month of November, anno sociatatis XVI, in their Barony of Bergental, to induct Lord Wilhem de Broc into the Order of the Tygers Combatant, and remit this day to your remembrance.

My counsel hath told me I may set a letter that you may have word of this. And may our blessed Lord ever preserve you and Wilhem and be your governor and defender. All this is so endorsed by the signatures of golden King Gregor and radiant Queen Kiena which bless this page, having been witnessed by the clerk and herald and all assembled in the Court this great day.

AoA – Lucie Lovegood

If fortune has been kind than you have met
This lady from the lovely English sea
Whose graces must serve as perfect key
As none have failed to love this sweet soubrette.

When she is near all worldly things forget.
She seems to solve all ills so gracefully
Perhaps it is how she attends to thee,
Her virtues maketh people not to fret.

Her pleasant smile at gate thou may have seen.
Perhaps you heard her laugh behind a shield,
Or on the path of errands she has run.
O what to do with worker so serene,
Who set on any task will just not yield?

Ah, here is notion for this vibrant one!
From this day forth shall Lady be her name!
Thought bold King Gregor and Queen Kiena bright,
And swift decided, unto our delight,
One Lady Lucie Lovegood we would claim!

In AS forty-six thusly ordained,
At Tournament for Eastern Crown, this rite,
Beneath the fifth day’s cold November light,
In Bergental, her ladyship attains.

 

Laurel Scroll for Lord Tristan de Worrell

Laurel Scroll written for Lord Tristan de Worrell, presented at East Kingdom Court at the Pennsic War 40, AS46

Beneath the bright aurora’s light
A wise man with his cart here stands,
St. Eligius’ student greets the night
with kindly eyes and worthy hands.

Within his cheery wooden cart
are cheeses soft, or wrapped in rind,
and wines so sweet, and wines so tart,
and sausages his hands did grind.

In Boxes fine of carv-ed wood
Pierced-work and repoussé do shine.
By Champlevé* so bright and good
Are roundels of ancient design.

His curve-ed spoons shine like the sun;
His tents give shelter from its rays;
His baskets from the trees are spun;
His Songbird’s song echoes for days.

Love Conquers All, the words do read,
His Truth is carved upon wood arms.
Other good things that one might need,
And time, he gives free as small charms.

This man, Lord Tristan de Worrell
By works of beauty fine and rare
Is now bedeck’d with sweet laurel
And garners thus his treatment fair.

Take this man now into your fold
And give him leaves of shining green
That all may freely now behold
This Laurel of such gentle mien.

Arms are granted, fully able
to display in etch-ed copper
Or, two boars combattant sable
base a wooden barrel proper.

Now Forty-six, the year we mark
Forty years of the Pennsic War
Here ten days into Augusts’ arc
Tristan takes all Eastern rapport.

Thus in the Mighty Eastern Court
By King Lucan this writ is signed,
In full with Jana Queen’s support
That Tristan now is Laurel-kind.

**(shomp leevay)

Queen & King’s Archery Champion Scrolls, AS46

Both scrolls are based on the Byzantine Chant to St. Cyril (feast day June 19th) & St. Athanasios (feast day May 2). They were chanted/sung at the Court of King Lucan VIII at Vinland Raids in the Barony of Smoking Rock, AS46.

You may hear the scrolls sung (sadly, at desk not at court) here…

Queen’s Archery Champion Scroll

You became radiant
by your magnificent deeds,
meeting every mark
and becoming conquering champion.
Your skill has enriched all
and the East became greatly glorified.
You are found most worthy by our Queen
who this day now calls you Champion.

Master Krakken Gnashbone, thus it is the will of resplendent Jana Regina that you are named Queen’s Champion of Archery, this 18th day of June, AS XLVI in the Barony of Smoking Rocks.

King’s Archery Champion Scroll

As swift flies the arrow
you are now surely known
by your noble flights,
thus catching the attention of our King.
With your gifts set for the East
you bring great honor and glory to her.
You have worthily met every task
and are now this day called Champion.

Lord Kusunoki Yoshimoto, thus it is the will of ever-bold Lucan Rex that you are named King’s Champion of Archery, this 18th day of June, AS XLVI in the Barony of Smoking Rocks.

 

Original Text

You became radiant
by your orthodox deeds
quelling all heresy
and becoming conquering champions.
Your piety enriched all
and the church became greatly beautified
You have worthily found Christ our God
who by your prayers grants all great mercy.

I used the following site: http://chant.hchc.edu/ to learn the chants. The tunes and lyric are based on the women’s version in English of the chants for the feast day of Saints Athanasius and Cyril, whose feast day was closest to the event.

Scroll for EK Queen’s Rapier Champion AS 45

Sir Edward Grey of Lochleven
wreathed with greatest honor is revealed,
and with the most esteem, picked from the field.

Forbearance and Honor noted our queen,
Beloved lady of bliss, Aikaterine.
The rapier swift has its song to sing
And dances as swallows dance in spring
Through the field’s rite,
Bright glinting light
This blade did supply
You being near
We shall not fear,
Though Death stand by.

With you the swords take edge, the heart grows bold;
From you in fee their lives your liegemen hold.
Our lady Queen smiles on this one’s goodwill
Thus now the Champion’s role thou must fulfill.
Bless then the hour
That gives the power
In which you may,
At bed and board,
Embrace your sword
Both night and day.

From Bergental through all the East ring true
Thus mark we January twenty-two
Anno Societis forty-five
When the Queen’s Rapier Champion did arrive
Bless then the one
Whose duty done
With skill and grace,
and courtesy
we honor thee,
Signed in this place…

Honor, great honor, from our noble queen,
Beloved lady of bliss, Aikaterine.

 

Notes on the piece:

This poem is based on The Forest’s Queen by Philip Massinger, <span>originally published in The Guardian in 1633.  Below is the original, from which the central part of the poem is hugely based (because it was sooooo perfect!)  The scan works better on paper than out loud in parts because our lovely Queen of Love and Beauty is sounds the “e” at the end of </span>Aikaterine (Aikaterine-ah.)  I didn’t want to mar the beautiful look of the piece’s symmetry with the original by mucking about too much, so I decided to live with it even though it’s an extra syllable here and there.  Consider it a bonus!

THE ORIGINAL WORK: THE FOREST’S QUEEN by: Philip Massinger

Welcome, thrice welcome to this shady green,

Our long-wished Cynthia, the forest’s queen!

The trees begin to bud, the glad birds sing

In winter, changed by her into the spring.

We know no night,

Perpetual light

Dawns from your eye:

You being near,

We cannot fear,

Though death stood by.

From you our swords take edge, our hearts grow bold;

From you in fee their lives your liegemen hold.

These groves your kingdom, and our laws your will;

Smile, and we spare; but if you frown, we kill.

Bless then the hour

That gives the power

In which you may,

At bed and board,

Embrace your lord

Both night and day.

 

Welcome, thrice welcome to this shady green,

Our long-wished Cynthia, the forest’s queen!