Scroll text for Gnaea Celera – Silver Brooch & Award of Arms

Handmade calligraphy of words for Gnaea Celera.
Mari’s beautiful cadel and script elevate the words!

Scroll text for Gnaea Celera

Vīsiō ad orbam per gratia artis.*
Audite verbis Ivan et Matilde que regis regineque regnum orientalis.
Scite quotd his litteris agnoscimus virtutem dignitatemque subjecti nostrorum  Gnaea Celera.
Celear ultro meretur quam ob rem ametur; ita dapsiliter suos amicos alit.*
Vitriarius artificium  suum supremum optumum adpellat. Creare pulchras creterras, vitrum lepistas. Nulla dies sine artēs.*
Ergo Celera consocias cum consortium fibula argentum. Extollimus  et assignamus ei ordonis domina et beneficium armis [____blazon________]. Fit manibus nostris in IX die Decembris anno societatis LLI epulāribus baronia Bhakailia festum adventi.


She sees the world through love of art.*
Pay heed to the words of Ivan and Matilde, Tsar and Tsaritsa of the East Kingdom.
Know that by these letters we recognize the worth and dignity of our subject Gnaea Celera.
Celera earns of herself the merit of being loved; so abundantly does she nourish her friends.*
The glassmaker calls on her art, the all-highest and good. She creates  beautiful bowls and glass goblets. She has not a day without art.*
Therefore, we join Celera with the Order of the Silver Brooch.
We extole her and commit her to the rank of lady and grant to [him/her] all rights to the arms [______blazon________]. Done by our hands on the 9 day of December, in the year of the society 52 at the Yule Feast in the Barony of Bhakail.

*adapted from fragments of poems by Gnaeus Naevius

This was written to be presented in either long-paragraph or short paragraph style in the scroll. Calligraphy and Illumination was done by by Mari Clock.  It has 86 words in Latin and138 in the English translation.

This work includes Latin text from the Drachenwald AOA text contributed by contributed by Lady Aryanhwy merch Catmael. It also contains adapted fragments of poems by Gnaeus Naevius, Roman epic poet and dramatist. Any errors in the Latin are mine. (I had to do a lot of looking up in the conjugation dictionary!) If you want to see what it looks like when I try to write this stuff, here’s the link to the hairy, messy document where I take notes and figure out what I’m doing.