Hweat! Celowyn

And in Anglo Saxon, because…

Hweat! Celowyn

(Hweat Hweat Hweat)

naéfre ic máran geseah 

þæt gód lenge swá  gód

( swá  gód, swá  gód, swá  gód)

secge ic þé to sóðe

þæs wéndon aér 

þæt híe naéfre wolde.


 

This is how it translates / retranslates.

Sweet Caroline

(buh buh buh)

Good times never seemed so good

I’ve been inclined

To believe they never would

But now I…

Hweat! Celowyn

(Hweat Hweat Hweat)

naéfre ic máran geseah

þæt gód lenge swá  gód

( swá  gód, swá  gód, swá  gód)

secge ic þé to sóðe

þæs wéndon aér

þæt híe naéfre wolde

Hey Celowyn

(hey hey hey)

Never have I seen

that good time

so good

I say to you in truth

it was thought before

that they never would

 

Below are the notes of a crazy person trying to put “Sweet Caroline” into Anglo Saxon. Because this is what passes for documentation at 2am. 

naéfre ic máran geseah eorla ofer eorþa never have I seen greater noble on earth  
aénig heora þóht  none of them thought   

ofgyfan wolde  ( should be willing to give up)

þæs ne wéndon aér    it was not thought before

þæt naéfre Grendel swá fela   gryra gefremede
that Grendel would have never so many   atrocities committed,

þæt híe healfre geweald  /  that they would half of it control

secge ic þé to sóðe,   sunu Ecgláfes, I say to you in truth,   son of Edgelaf,

http://www.heorot.dk/beowulf-rede-text.html

Dammit, now I’ve had to puzzle it out…

Hweat! Celowyn (Hweat Hweat Hweat)

þæt gód lenge  (that  good time)

ne wæs þæt gód síð (was not so got

naéfre gít æt lenge (never yet at time?)

naéfre wolde

swá gód lengen aéfre wolde ( it seemed never would?)

ne wæs þæt forma síð /  it was not the first time

….

Fyrst forð gewát· time passed by

góde gode

gódum  good things

gódne good one

 þaér se góda sæ _____ there sat the good  _____

grundwong þone    ofgyfan wolde· this earth    should be willing to give up;
sceolde willan    wíc eardian he was obliged to be about to    inhabit a dwelling
elles hwergen·    swá sceal aéghwylc mon elsewhere,    as must every man
álaétan laéndagas.    Næs ðá long tó ðon abandon loaned-days.    It was not long to when
þæt ðá áglaécean hý eft gemétton: that the fierce enemies  

Sweeting Carolyne

Because when you hear that your king was singing the original from the back of a truck after fighting the Pennsic woods battle, you just have to answer that call in period.


 

When icumen in,

I cannot starte to ken

But then I ken strong it groweth

Merie the spring,

after springe cometh sumer

who wolde ken thou shoulde come to me?

Hand toucheth hand

reacheth out,

toucheth I, toucheth thou

Sweeting Carolyne (fa la la!)

Gode times neuer seem’d so gode. (so gode, so gode, so gode!)

I hath been inclined (fa la la!)

to believe they neuer wolde

Look, there is the night.

It seemeth not so lonely,

With twa we fill

we hath filled it with but two.

And when I hurte,

Hurt runneth from mine shoulder,

whilst I hold my lemman, I am not sore

Warmth, toucheth warmth,

reacheth out,

toucheth I, toucheth thou

Sweeting Carolyne (fa la la!)

Gode times neuer seem’d so gode. (so gode, so gode, so gode!)

I hath been inclined (fa la la!)

to believe they neuer wolde

Sweeting Carolyne (fa la la!)

Gode times neuer seem’d so gode. (so gode, so gode, so gode!)

I hath been inclined (fa la la!)

to believe they neuer wolde

& etc….

(And the original) 
Where it began,
I can’t begin to knowin’
But then I know it’s growing strong
Was in the spring
And spring became the summer
Who’d have believed you’d come along.
Hands, touchin’ hands
Reachin’ out, touchin’ me, touchin’ you
Sweet Caroline
Good times never seemed so good
I’ve been inclined
To believe they never would
But now I…
…look at the night
And it don’t seem so lonely
We fill it up with only two.
And when I hurt,
Hurtin’ runs off my shoulders
How can I hurt when holding you?
Warm, touchin’ warm
Reachin’ out, touchin’ me, touchin’ you
Sweet Caroline
Good times never seemed so good
I’ve been inclined,
To believe they never would
Oh, no, no
Sweet Caroline
Good times never seemed so good
Sweet Caroline,
I believe they never could
Sweet Caroline
Good times never seemed so good
Sweet Caroline…

My lemman doth give me joy!

A Song of Love in Celebration of the Tenth Anniversary of Mistress Fia Kareman and Sir Matthew Moreaveous Avdenmork created by Baroness Aneleda Falconbridge.

Commissioned by Sir Matthew for performance near the Feast Day of St. Swithins in the Year of Our Lord MMXV.

My lemman* doth give me joy!
My lemman doth give me joy!
All like the spring in may anew
doth maketh the girl and boy
dance in the meadow merrily.

He bringth her to the field of play
wherein the tournament is held.
Her sleeve the gallant doth display,
no weapon better weld –  I see
Cupid’s conscript, love’s devotee.

He bringth her flowers of the field
And all good things that gather joy
e’en those which cleverly concealed
hath made her lemman coy – it seems
as round us summer sunlight streams.

My lemman doth give me joy!
My lemman doth give me joy!
All like the spring in may anew
doth maketh the girl and boy
dance in the meadow merrily.

He walks her to the greeny glade,
upon his knee these words he said,
‘Ere we embark on our crusade,
O let us be wed – my heart
That I from you shall never part.

Agree, did she, that Swithins Day*
to stand with him in gale or sun,
in health and injury to stay.
And with the asking done – I see
her kin came forth at his decree.

My lemman doth give me joy!
My lemman doth give me joy!
All like the spring in may anew
doth maketh the girl and boy
dance in the meadow merrily.

Surprised the lady was to find
there stood a servant of Our Lord.
For hearts and souls and hands to bind,
and taketh down their word – my dear
while all around them friends appear’d.

Emboldened by their earnest vow
with love she chided his deceit.
Yet good intent can lies endow!
In spite of their conceit – be bless’d
When sweet with love they are confessed.

My lemman doth give me joy!     |e e e b b e
My lemman doth give me joy !    |e e e b b e
All like the spring in may anew   |d g a b b ag f e
doth maketh the girl and boy       |e e e e b e f g a b
dance in the meadow merrily.      | b a f g f e d e


*Notes

Leeman is a word meaning “lover” used in Middle English love poetry. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/leman

Swithin’s Day: The events discussed in this work took place during a weekend of the Great Northeastern War in Malagentia, traditionally the weekend after July 4th, making it always in the ‘teens of the month of July. St. Swithin’s Day is July 15th, which I judged close enough. There are songs from the middle ages which mention the day, and since this is a bit of a small dance-like piece, it seemed fitting to reference it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swithun

Now Springes the Spray – a Kilf Challenge

So Andrew Blackwood, a friend and bard in the Midrealm, issued a challenge for the recent Midrealm Bardic Madness event based on an idea brought up on the drive back from Known World Cooks and Bards in Northshield last September.

It was to create a contra-contrafact in which one uses period lyrics and sets them to music, rather than the regular contrafact in which one writes new lyrics and sets them to an existing period (or not) song. Since that’s also called “filk”, Andrew called this challenge “off a kilf”, as it’s the opposite of the contrafact. Here is the challenge write-up: http://apapermuse.wordpress.com/off-a-klif-bardic-madness-south-2014/ where you can also hear the other artists’ version of this song.

The lyric chosen was a song called “Now Springtes the Spray” written by an anonymous poet in the 1300’s. The words were posted in both the period English and in modern English. The entrants each went to Andrew and performed away from the other entrants; he recorded the pieces. This was so people would not be influenced by the other performers. The result is pretty amazing – diverse and cool!

I’d planned to write my own version, record it, and send it out to him before Bardic Madness but it just didn’t happen. However, I decided to create one today and so this morning, after a study of the text and some thinking, I wrote a piece for voice and harp. Medieval music loved the fifth and so this is set very simply using only, really, four notes. I used the older words but didn’t hold to the earlier pronunciation.

Now Springes the Spray –  Anon. c.1300

Als I me rode this endre day
O’ my pleyinge
Seih I whar a litel may
Began to singe
“The clot him clinge!
Way as him I’ love-longinge
Shall libben ay!”

Now springes the spray
All for love I am so seek
That slepen I ne may

Son I herde that mirye note
Thider I drogh I fonde hire
In an herber swot
Under a bogh
With joye enough
Son I asked, “Thou mirue may
Why singes tou ay?”

Now springes the spray
All for love I am so seek
That slepen I ne may

Than answerde that maiden swote
Midde wordes fewe
“My lemman me haves bihot
Of love trewe
He changes anewe
Yiif I may, it shall him rewe
By this day!”

Now springes the spray
All for love I am so seek
That slepen I ne may

By the Weight of the Chain

This piece requires an introduction.

I wrote this song as a song about chivalry, and The Chivalry in the Society, because I felt there should be a song in which the aspirant has agency and acts on a lifetime of work to achieve her or his goal. I didn’t want a narrative song, about another person, but I wanted a first-person account of the love and work and the valor and vowing that is needed to become a Chivalric Peer. Many of the Knights and Masters of Arms I know who have been recognized as such to date have followed a path similar to the one I outline – each in their own way, but the path seemed pretty clear to me. I also wanted it to work for a man or a woman, and for a Knight or a Master. And finally, it had to have some pep and joy because to me the best chivalry is enacted with a heart of joy and forward motion.

This is that song.

The public debut was at Pennsic 43 at my concert, though it had been sung for two people before that night, one of whom was in vigil when I brought it as a song-gift.

There is a recording of the piece as it was first imagined and performed is at the bottom of the page. It has changed in tune, but it’s a good archive of how this stuff evolves.

The recording below was done at the SCA 50 Year Celebration and features Lady Abhlin and THL Andreas Blackwoode.

Aneleda Falconbridge “By the Weight of the Chain”
written July 20, 2014. Copyright Monique Bouchard 2014.

**By the weight of the chain
of gold I wear upon me
By the white of the cloth
about my body bound
By the spurs on my heels
I do swear upon my honor
to uphold the Knightly virtues
till I lay beneath the ground.**

When I was young
I watched the Knights go riding,
their armor so bright
and their glory brighter still.
My hands were small
but my dreams lay large around me
and once the goal had found me
I set out to gain my skill.

By the weight of the chain

When I had fledged,
I served as I was able,
I found worthy knights
and asked to learn their ways.
My form grew strong,
sturdy plates I wore upon it –
when I finally could don it
and the heavy sword could raise.

By the weight of the chain…

When I had grown
I followed into battles
warriors of legend
with my war-kin at my side.
My mind grew calm,
all their lessons moving through me,
my foes could not undo me
with these masters as my guide.

By the weight of the chain…

When I was raised
I stood before my sovereigns
and my new kinsmen
and unto them pledged my troth.
My heart is bold,
To my best I shall endeavor
to defend the dream forever
which first took me toward my oath.

By the weight of the chain…

When I was young
I watched the Knights go riding,
their armor so bright
and their glory brighter still.
My hands were small
but my dreams they did bind me
now that the goal did find me
I will ever heed its will.

_______________________________________________

…so later I went to the  Known World Bardic Congress and Cooks Collegium VII and while there I spent time with old friends and made some new ones.

I’d been invited to be a performer in a concert called “Luminaries” in which performers from 11 Kingdoms would participate. The names were familiar – a veritable who’s who of intimidating order. I was given the chance to perform and represent the East. Selecting the song had me in fits and I finally settled on “Weight of the Chain.”

Now I’d been hanging out listening to music late at night with a pile of people (imagine!) and Andrew Blackwood McBain and Kari Garanhirsson sang “Sons of the Dragon” and I was all kinds of blown away.

So I said, “HEY WE GOTTA DO THIS THING” and dragged them off into the night, you know, like you do.

I sang “Weight of the Chain” to them and then just said, more or less, “Ok. Do what you do.”  Mistress Zsof joined us and gave some artistic coaching as to the arrangement and we practiced it a few times before going to bed.  Before the concert we ran through it twice, where it really locked in.

The concert was pretty cool.

Here’s our part, now with three…

And you can download you own version in mp3 here….
http://mbouchard.com/misc/By-the-Weight-of-the-Chain–Aneleda-Andrew-Kari.mp3

_______________________________________________

Then Kari looked at me with big, soulful puppydog eyes and asked if he could please sing it. So, ok sure! And then Zsof asked if she could play. So, ok sure!

Now, you gotta understand this. Kari is the singer for a band, Deadiron. When he lets his hair out of the ponytail, he transforms into a rockgod. Which happens with alarming regularity and also he has nicer hair than I do so I’m jealous. But I digress…

We tried it. And this is what happened:

Original draft version recording below.