Maybe fame and probably not fortune…

Just in case anyone thinks the money and fame may go to one’s head, I’m posting my earnings from CD Baby. 😉  Some of the amounts are fascinating. As you can see, artists are brutalized by the pricing of their works on Google Music and iTunes, which make a big difference.

Support an artist through their own website, and you’ll generally help them be able to make more music. <3 (Studio time is expensive, and it’s hard to do that when iTunes pays half of what you charge on your own website.)

Of course, I am grateful for anyone who has purchased my music, or even listened to it in a streaming venue, as the pennies literally add up, but this might show a little what it’s like to be selling music in the modern, digital age.

$10.92 for album download of Aneleda Falconbridge: I Am of the North
$10.92 for album download of Aneleda Falconbridge: I Am of the North
$10.92 for album download of Aneleda Falconbridge: I Am of the North
$6.37 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$6.37 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$6.37 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Apple iTunes
$5.92 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Amazon MP3
$2.55 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Apple iTunes
$1.86 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes-Canada
$0.64 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Apple iTunes
$0.64 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Apple iTunes
$0.47 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.38 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.30 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.24 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.18 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$0.13 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$0.11 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.09 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.08 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.08 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.08 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.08 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Locker
$0.07 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.07 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through YouTube Music
$0.06 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.06 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.05 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes Match – Americas
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes Match – Americas
$0.04 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Locker
$0.03 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Locker
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.02 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes Match – Americas
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes Match – Americas
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes Match – Americas
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes Match – Americas
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Google Music Store
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through Spotify
$0.01 for DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SALES through iTunes – Apple Music – Europe

You Never Know

I was elevated this past weekend to the Order of the Laurel. I’m overjoyed and I’ll probably start writing about all of my thoughts as they come but first, I will give you that which was, seriously, the most frequently given piece of thought given in my vigil, because it’s relevant to all of us. It’s basically a distillation of the “PLQs” — Don’t Be A Jerk.
 
While that last word varied, the sentiment was the same.
 
The other thing I want to share is this:

You Never Know.

I was given a tiny frog with a charm attached to it, which read “You Never Know.” Those words came back again and again in their relevance and reflection on the day – and I want you to have them.
 
There was one story that came up on a few occasions in my vigil – one story more than any others. The nature of it surprised me because it was not about a success, a triumph, a great work, but about a very public failure.
 
I entered a Bardic Champions event two years after I’d served in the role of royal bard. I was singing a piece that was meaningful to me, that I’d written. I’d practiced my fingers off to create a harp accompaniment for it. I knew and respected all the judges, loved the sitting royalty, and while it was an exhibition for me, it was important. And the performance was in honor of a friend who couldn’t be there. I was well respected, I had a little mythos around me after my time as Champion. People knew who I was.
 
I tanked. Spectacularly. My fingers failed to find the notes. I was sweaty and lost confidence. I lost my key. Then as I desperately tried to correct, I started forgetting the words. It was like losing control of a jet, then when you try to regain control, you pull off the steering mechanism instead. Then looking back, you see the tail is on fire and the wings are falling off. I could have ejected but instead, I laughed the laugh of the damned in the middle of the song, girded my loins, and the rode that performance straight into the ground where I buried it in twelve feet of mud and when done, I crawled out and stood on its smoldering wreckage. It was so terrible that my friends just stared in disbelief, trying to look more polite than horrified. There was video, but it was so bad that the videographer wouldn’t even share it privately with me, saying that some things are better left alone. It was actually the worst performance of my life. (And I’m not even kidding.)
 
After my bow, I walked off the stage and started laughing. It was just so amazingly horrible. It was so bad that people didn’t even pretend that it wasn’t to be polite. (I’m laughing now so hard that my eyes are watering.)
 
It was that performance, above all my other (solid, good performances), which affected people who were there the most.
 
Why? It was an inadvertent ode to failure and risk. It went from tragedy to lesson because I laughed. It was so far from perfect – the polar opposite. But it was a reminder for me to not take myself seriously and I laughed because really, what else is there to do in the face of failure?
 
You Never Know.
 
I didn’t know until my vigil how many people reflected on that moment when they were undertaking something new, something they felt unconfident about.
 
That failure proved inspirational. (!) Because I could fail (ha! often! just not so publicly!) and that at the end I laughed at myself. Bearing witness to that spectacle gave them permission to go ahead and try something and if it failed – it’s ok. If it’s not great at a contest – it’s ok. If it isn’t taken seriously – it’s ok. Even if people give you a little pity for it – it’s ok. Just do the thing.
 
At the end of the day, it’s about you and your art and what makes you happy.
 
So, my friends, share your process and failures. Show others what you’ve learned in those failures. They’re possibly more important than your successes – because that’s how learning goes.
 
And also…
 
You Never Know.
 

 

A Bardic Class for Younger Children

I like it when children sing but recognize that it can be a challenge to find good “SCA” music to connect them to. This is why I love rounds! There’s lots of support and everyone can play together.

I was asked if I had suggestions for a class for bardic performance for children and I’ve done some spontaneous work with littles at events, and thought it would be fun to make a more organized class out of it. It’s a lot of what I’ve done “in the field” but with more structure.


Start with introductions and talk about music a bit in period. Ask questions like

What did people do for fun?
When might people make music?
What kinds of instruments were available?
What was ALWAYS available?

Talk a bit about how we make music now.

How is it different?
When do we sing?
Where do we see and hear performances?
What kinds of things do we sing about?

Medieval people sang about a lot of things. They sang about God and saints and about people they knew. Music was important because it was available to everyone.

Sing common children’s rounds to get warmed up and comfortable. Do them in this order if possible.

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star 
Alphabet Song (does this song sound kind of the same as the last song?)
Row Row Row Your Boat
(unison, then try it as a round)

Questions for these songs:

Which song is a story? What is the story about? Songs often told stories about people, places, and events. We call that “narrative” when something is telling us a story.
Which song is a lesson?  What is it teaching us? Songs were used to teach people things sometimes, especially religion and some stories, because songs are easier to remember and also not everyone knew how to read words.
Which songs sound the same? Twinkle Twinkle and the ABC song use the same tune more or less. We call it “contrafact” and in medieval times, like now, many people used the same music to sing different songs.

Some songs changed, some stayed the same!

Three Blind Mice (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609) comparison is good here. Start with the modern one, then teach the original one.
http://mbouchard.com/aneleda/three-blind-mice-then-and-now

People sang songs that were about other people!

Lady Come Down (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609):
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/pammelia/pam_36small.html
Lady come down and see the cat sits in the plum tree!

Oh My Love (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609):
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/songbook/oh_my_loue.html or
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/deuteromelia/deut_37small.html
Oh my love, love thou me? Then quick come and save him that dies for thee!

People sang songs about their problems:

This is an Elizabethan song about complaining, My Goose.

My Goose (trad. probably in SCA period):
http://kodalysongweb.net/sites/default/files/Goose%20Round.pdf
“Why shouldn’t my goose sing as well as thy goose when I paid for my goose twice as much as thine??”

Hey Ho Nobody at Home (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609):
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/rheyhonobody.html
Hey ho nobody home, meat nor drink nor money have I none, yet I will be merry, very merry!

People even sang to sell things!

Songs were some of the first advertisements and music is still used to sell things! Listen to the radio and TV and you’ll hear how that works!

Hot Mutton Pies (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609): The group can be divided into three sellers for this street call. Or they can learn the whole song. It’s a fun round. They could make up their own products if they catch on fast.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/rcatch52.html
Hot mutton pies hot, buy my dainty young beans, my young beans, crabs crabs any crabs?

People sang in Latin, and other languages.

Viva La Musica (Michael Praetorius, 1571-1621):  Long live music!
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/rvivamusica.html

Dona Nobis Pacem (credited to Giovanni Palestrina, 1525-1594): Give us peace.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/donanobis.html
(Do one part at a time, and if you can work a round out of it, it’s good. This is a good ending song too since many people of all ages know it and may join in if invited.)

Other pieces which are good choices for children include:

The Great Bells of Oseney (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609): It sounds like bells ringing
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/rdeut9.html

Go to Joan Glover (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609): A sweet song about passing notes via song, really.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/rjoanglover.html

Joan Come Kiss Me Now (Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609): This is short and sweet, but has a tricky accidental. Fun to have people sub out other people’s names.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~msmiller/rjoankiss.html

Any of the Three Country Dances in One – Particulary good is the Tenor Robin Hood.
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/pammelia/pam_37small.html

Encourage your attendees to teach someone the songs they learned and perform them at the bardic circles at the event. 

I have had success bringing the group out into someplace where “the public” can see them and having them perform “in concert” one of the pieces the did better at. It’s always been a big success and everyone has felt good about it at the end. A very positive way to end the session.

The East Kingdom Sing MOAR Project

I found these notes recently in a random file and decided to share them.

Goal: Create a culture of group singing in the East.  Create and encourage singing opportunities, informal group-sing, and a positive feeling for singing in the SCA for people of all kinds.

DESIRES

  • people want to sing
  • group fun singing
  • informal singing

BARRIERS

  • geography
  • conflicting activities
  • unfamiliarity with SCA songs
  • different versions of songs
  • focus often on individual bards/performers
  • diverse feelings of competency
  • little time for practice
  • knowing when to sing / SCA-appropriate material
  • maybe language barriers
  • inability to read sheet music
  • some physical barriers / comfort barriers

SOLUTIONS

  INCREASE ACCESS

  • website with songs and sheet music
  • youtube vids of people singing
  • CD of common SCA songs
  • book of lyrics / sheet music

INCREASE OPPORTUNITY

  • more music-themed events
  • more choirs (formal/informal)
  • more open performing (“the call”)

THE PLAN

Kingdom Plan

  • collect sheet music of easy period stuff and rounds
  • collect “SCA” song lyrics
  • have music and lyrics available
  • offer to teach when it’s convenient for others
  • be approachable, offer often
  • facilitate informal learning situations that aren’t intimidating
  • encourage casual singing
  • give out lyrics/music if possible
  • encourage people who do not consider themselves to be singers to join in
  • stress that there’s no commitment or expectation
  • stress that “talent” is not nearly as important as participation

Local Plan

  • collect sheet music of easy period stuff and rounds
  • collect “SCA” song lyrics
  • get my shire “sing thing” to learn a bunch of stuff new to them
  • get the sing thing to let me video the stuff they DO know
  • put it on a youtube channel with lyrics on the videos
  • add the link to lyric/music

SONGS SUGGESTED BY PEOPLE

  • Wyndrith Berginsdottir songs
  • Rimini
  • Bow to the Crown
  • March of Campbreath
  • Mariah’s song
  • Peasant Knight
  • Shieldwall
  • Forsaking all others
  • A white belt is foerever
  • The Standing Stones
  • Byrd – non nobie
  • L’homme arme
  • Song of the sheldwall
  • Born on the Listfield
  • Light of the East
  • Ave Tigris
  • Eastern Tyger’s Roar
  • Regnum Oriantalis
  • Oriens Victoriousus
  • Welcome Home
  • Crusader’s Song
  • Lamas Night
  • The Quest
  • Cold Iron
  • The Pict Song
  • Boreal Star
  • Fires of Endwearde
  • The Feast Song
  • Dona nobis
  • Gaudatae
  • Siuil a Run
  • River Run Red
  • I Am of the North

Period Songs I Can Sing

I started to think about period music I know and period music I’m learning.
For my own brain, I decided to make a list. And figured that here is as good a place as any to keep it.

Period Songs I am Working On Currently (though slowly!)

Robin Ma’maime: Adam de la Halle, 13c
A l’entrada del tens clar: Anon, 12c
Douce Dame Joile: Guiamme de Machault, 14c
Reis Glorious: Guiralt de Bornelh, 12c
Prendes I Garde: Guilame d’Amiens, 13c
Or La Truix: Anon 13/14c
Kalenda Maya: Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, Southern French, c. 1155-1207
Ja Nus Hons Pris: Richard the Lionheart, written 1192 – 94 (And my contrafact “Neuer Ye Yeve Away” to this same tune)
Winder wie ist: Neithart von Ruenthal,12c
C’Est la Fins: Guilame d’Amiens, 13c

 (These are mostly in French, which I do not speak, and so the words are extra slow going. I am also working to be able to accompany myself on my big psaltery harp or gothic lyre since they’re likely instruments similar to what a solo singer might have had at her disposal. I’m quite in love with the sound and feel of this music, and will be working toward learning them as well as I know my handful of beloved Middle English songs.)

Period Songs I Can Sing Upon Request

Sumer is Icomin In: Anon.,part-song from the 12 th century
Antiphon for the Virgin (Cum Erubureint): Hildegarde von Bingen, early 12th century
I Have a Younge Sister:
Middle English lyric/ based on the John Flegel arrangement
Maiden in the Moor Lay:* MS Sloane 2593. c. 1430.
The Herne:* anon 14c/ Breton tune
Sainte Nicholas, God is Druth (Hymn to St. Godric):
St. Godric of Finchale, also called St.Nicholas (c. 1070-1170)
Where the Bee Sucks: words Shakespeare “The Tempest” / tune Robert Johnson, late 16th century
Pass Time with Good Company: Henry VIII, early 16 th century
All in a Garden Green:
anon/John Playford’s collection “The English Dancing Master” 1651

Three Ravens: Ravenscroft, 1611
Amirilli Mia Bella: Giulio Caccini, 1614

Songs That Only Are Fun With Other People (Rounds etc)

Three Blind Mice: Ravenscroft 1609
Round of Three Country Dances in One:
Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609

John Kiss Me Now: Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
Hey Downe Downe: Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
Hey Ho, Nobody Home:
Anon.,round collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, late 16 th century

I Am Athirst: Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
Hot Mutton Pies (anon)
Banbury Ale Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
New Oysters Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
Joan Glover Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
To Portsmouth Collected by Thomas Ravenscroft, 1609
Hey Ho to the Greenwood
We Be Three Poor Mariners:
Ravenscroft
Of All The Birds:
Ravenscroft
Lady Come Down and See: Ravenscroft
Come Follow: John Hilton (17c)

Songs Which I Can Perform from Music and/or Lyric Sheets

Worldes blis ne last no throwe: Middle English
Miri it is while sumer ilast:
Middle English
Blow Northern Wind:
Middle English
Alison:
Middle English
Byrd one Brire: Middle English, Camb. King’s Coll. MS Muniment Roll 2 W. 32r
Victime Pascale Laudes (Easter Sequence): 1200, Wippo of Burgundy
The Rules of the List: Chant, Gregorian mode, c.1350 😉
Ah Robin, Gentle Robin: William Cornish the Younger, d.1523
Blow Thy Horne Hunter: William Cornish the Younger, d.1523
O Lusty May:
Anon 16c
Wir Zogen In Das Feld:  Landschneckt marching song, 1540
Matona Lovely Maiden: English “translation”, Orlando di Lasso, c. 1532-1594
Mon Coeur Se Recommande a Vous/My Heart is Offered Still to You: Orlando di Lasso, mid 1500s
The Northern Lasses Lamentation to the tune Goddesses ; or, The Unhappy Maids Misfortune : John Playford’s collection “The English Dancing Master” 1651;
Farewell Adeiu (to the tune of Selliger’s Round)
: Anon.

Country Man’s Delight (to the tune of Selliger’s Round) : Anon.
Young Men and Maids (to the tune of Selliger’s Round) : Anon.
Oh Mistress Mine: text Shakepeare, Twelfth Night: Act II, Scene 3; tune Anon.;
Greensleeves: Anon. first mentioned in 1580
When Joan’s Ale Was New: Anon. 1594
Come Again Sweet Love : John Dowland 1597
Can She Excuse My Wrongs : John Dowland 1597
Now is the Month of Maying : Thomas Morley 1595
Oh Lusty May : Anon. c.1550
Jack and Joan: Thomas Campion
I Care Not For These Ladies: Thomas Campion
Fair if You Expect Admiring: Thomas Campion
Fine Knacks for Ladies: anon/tune Dowland c1600.

Period Yule Music With Sheet Music

The Carnal and the Crane: Child 55, noted in the Oxford Book of Carols as having medieval origin
This Endris Night:
15th-century

Personent Hodie: Melody from Bavarian manuscript (1360), Lyrics from Piae Cantiones 1582
The Old Year Now Away Has Fled (Greensleeves): English Traditional, From a Black Letter Collection, 1642, Ashmolean Library, Oxford
To Drive the Cold Winter Away: Anonymous, before ca. 1625
Dona Nobis Pacem: Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, 1500s
Blow Blow Thou Winter Wind: Shakespeare/Goddesses
Get Ivy and Hull: words Thomas Tusser, 1558, tune traditional
Gaudete: Piae Cantiones of 1582
A Carol Bringing In the Boar’s Heed: Lyrics by: Wynkyn de Worde 1521
Good King Wenceslas: tune “Tempus Adest Foridum” (“Spring has unwrapped her flowers”) “Piae Cantiones” of 1582 lyricsJ.M. Neale, 1853
In a Manger He Is Lying: Polish Carol, 16th Century
Lo How a Rose: Es Ist Ein Ros, 15th Century German carol, Michael Praetorius, 1609
In Dulci Jubilo: Heinrich Suso (ca. 1295-1366) “In Dulci Jubilo,” 14th Century German melody
There Comes a Vessel Laden: Andernach Gesangbuch, 1608
Covertry Carol, Luly, lulay: Robert Croo, 1534. (The Coventry Plays are recorded as having been witnessed by Margaret, Queen of Henry VI, as early as 1456, by Richard III in 1484, and by Henry VII in 1492.)
Tommorow Shall Be My Dancing Day: date in question. The New Oxford Book of Carols suggests that the song was originally part of a medieval Mystery Play.
Wassail Wassail: Gloucestershire Wassail, traditional English, some verses believed from the middle ages
Bring a Torch Jeanette, Isabella: French Provençal Carol by Émile BlĂ©mont; French Tune adapted by Seguin from Charpentier (late 1600s)
I Saw Three Ships: John Forbes’ Cantus, 2nd. ed, and is also known as “As I Sat On A Sunny Bank”. It probably dates from the 16th century.
Riu Riu Chiu: Mateo Felcha the elder, Spanish Traditional, 16th Century
The Old Year Now Away Has Fled: Words: English Traditional, From a Black Letter Collection, 1642, Ashmolean Library, Oxford; Tune, Tudor traditional “Greensleeves”
Hey Ho Nobody Home: Traditional Round, Thomas Ravenscroft, published 1609
Veni Emmanuel / O Come, O Come Emmanuel: 15th Century French Plain Song melody; Some sources give a Gregorian, 8th Century origin